At mustard, we love to talk. Especially when it comes to sharing the latest thinking
on working trends across global industry. Here’s what we’ve been saying recently…


glastonbury: power of the pyramid

20-Jun-17


Hannah Ryan
We look at some of the ideas behind the stage designs at arguabely, the best festival in the world: Glastonbury.

It’s that time of the year where people pack up their tents and  head to Worthy Farm for none other than, Glastonbury Festival.

It’s been described by many as its own private ‘city’ as it’s full of weird and wonderful things to do; with an attendance of roughly 200,000 punters and performers. The site has grown in size to 900 acres, or around 1.4 square miles. The perimeter now runs a distance of 8.5 miles - around a third of the distance from Dover to Calais.

So it is essentially, a magical city that graces Somerset every year for one week – so we took some time to have a look at the designs behind some of the best stages and how the festival has developed in the last 40 years.
 
Pyramid Stage:

The first ever stage designed and built back in 1971, after the realisation from the first year that a stage was needed. Theatre designer Bill Harkin and his crew built it .from scaffolding, expanded metal and plastic sheeting.


As time went on and materials got more developed, the pyramid inevitably got stronger and by the year 2000, the stage was four times bigger than the original. The glittering 30m steel structure now covers 40m x 40m, uses four kilometres of steel tubing and weighs over 40 tonnes

The reasoning behind the shape of a pyramid was because of the belief that it was powerful: the apex projects energy upwards while energy from the stars and sun are drawn down. The pyramid is now known to symbolise the magic that Glastonbury offers.
 
Other stage:

Located just behind the Pyramid stage and was designed with the idea in mind that it would be a hub for more of the alternative genres; the Other Stage quickly became one of the most popular stages hosting the likes of Oasis, Blur and Pulp.

The Other Stage looks directly over the Somerset Levels towards Glastonbury and the Tor. Its history stretches back to the expansion of the Festival  in the late 1980s.


 

Healing Fields:

The Healing Fields are an underrated and underappreciated area of Glastonbury, with the reputation that it’s perhaps too ‘hippy’ when the reality is that it was a fundamental part of the rise of Glastonbury.



The design of the field expresses the petals of an Elemental Mandala. There are circles that embody the energies of Fire, Earth, Air and Water.  If you find the site then you’ll see that the layout is in fact split into four representing the energies – a very thought out process.
 
Shangri-La



Otherwise known to locals as the ‘naughty corner’ – one of the most lived areas of Glastonbury and one of the hardest areas to find.

Tucked away far from the main entrance the shelter is sought inside towers of textiles, pillars of plastic and columns of consumerism.

Shangri-La International Television Centre SHITV – triples its transmission by opening all day long for debates and discourse in DIY culture, documentary making and Activism. By night, it broadcasts the best in UK comedy and live art.


Recent blog posts

D&AD new blood festival 2017


New Blood Festival takes place at the The Old Truman Brewery in Shoreditch, London and this year the event was open to the public on the first week of July.  
 
The aim of the festival is to bring together emerging talent and industry professionals; a chance to network and.........

View more

glastonbury: power of the pyramid



It’s that time of the year where people pack up their tents and  head to Worthy Farm for none other than, Glastonbury Festival.

It’s been described by many as its own private ‘city’ as it’s full of weird and wonderful things to do; with an attendance of roughly 200,000.........

View more

graphics and tech monthly round up



World's first 4G-connected smart tent at Glastonbury Festival

Unless you live underneath a rock you know that it is Glastonbury Festival this week and this year they’ve turned it up a notch by introducing the word’s first 4G-connected smart tent.

This includes a mini fridge that tweets.........

View more

architecture monthly round up



Google finally reveals its plans for London HQ by BIG and Heatherwick

Google submitted a plan to extend their HQ with a new London campus two years ago and now finally, ideas are becoming reality and the designs are taking form.

Designed by Bjarke Ingels and Thomas Heatherwick,.........

View more

apprenticeship scheme



Did you know we have an apprenticeship scheme? Well you do now! An apprenticeship is a great way to kick start your career by combining on the job training with coursework to achieve an NVQ at the end of the year – no degree required. Joining our scheme allows you.........

View more